Angelo Sticchi Damiani

President of the Automobile Club d'Italia
FIA Club
Angelo Sticchi Damiani

A civil engineer, Angelo Sticchi Damiani, was born in Lecce in 1945. Professional in the field of road infrastructure, Angelo Sticchi Damiani is a successful road designer at national level. Rally driver in the 1970s, he has been a leader of the ACI Motor Sport Federation since 1975. From 1984 to 2000 he was International Race Director. His professional experience is linked to the world of motor sport through a number of projects in the field of plant engineering and racing tracks, including an international testing centre for the automotive sector. A former member of the FIA Circuits Commission, he was also a member of the FIA Senate from 2013 to 2017 and was appointed FIA Vice‑President for Sport in December 2017. He is member of the FIA World Motor Sport Council. As a classic car lover, he has participated in many historical races. He is the founder and President of “ACI Storico”, the classic car club of ACI. In 2010, he was awarded the “Gold Star for sporting merit” of the Italian National Olympic Committee (CONI) where he serves as national advisor.

Q. How does ACI see the deployment of connected mobility solutions in Rome and, in general, in Italian cities?
A.

Mobility is going through a time of great change, especially with respect to the technological innovations underway in the fields of communications and vehicles. These innovations, in turn, are bringing about great changes in individual habits and choices regarding mobility. We all want to always be informed and connected through our smartphones. We at ACI believe that the innovative mobility solutions available through smartphones are perfectly suitable for Rome and for Italy in general. I refer in particular to applications relating to Mobility as a Service (MaaS), enabling the user to choose among different mobility options and buy mobility-related services (parking and travel tickets, car rental, car sharing, etc.).

Q. What are some of the key initiatives that the Club has been promoting in this area?
A.

We have started to offer real-time information on the transport system in metropolitan areas under the brand “Luce Verde” (“Green Light”). Thanks to a great work of aggregation of the inputs coming from different sources (local police, road management authorities, transport service providers, etc.), we are able to provide real-time information on the whole mobility system in urban areas: crashes, road blocks, adverse weather conditions, transport timetables and fees, etc. Information is disseminated through all the media currently available: radio, social media, dedicated website, etc. Presently, we are considering whether to develop this service into a real MaaS information system, including multi-modal route planning and ticketing functions. We are also studying the possibility to develop a shared MaaS platform in synergy with FIA Region I and other European Clubs, and, we are in touch with some municipalities, notably with the town of Milan, to start a MaaS pilot. At the same time, we have enhanced our app “ACI Space” to include all the services available to ACI members: GPS-based roadside assistance; real-time information on traffic and travel route conditions; information on car-related procedures; news about the Club and Club services exclusive for members; insurance services; purchasing a new car, etc. Our goal is to evolve towards increasingly tailor-made services for our members.

Q. What is needed in the next five years to facilitate the transition to new forms of mobility in urban areas?
A.

I think that, in the next few years, all the actors of the mobility system (decision makers, technical experts, service providers and users) will need to collaborate towards a common goal: to improve the quality of mobility in order to improve the quality of life in urban areas. Without considering the issues of mobility infrastructure and services, which would need a new approach towards efficient mobility planning as well as ordinary and extraordinary maintenance, I believe that the key question is to improve access to mobility data, making it open. This is an issue peculiar to Italy, or rather to Latin countries, where everyone prefers not to share information out of fear of favoring potential competitors. On the contrary, when it comes to MaaS services, sharing all the information available is essential. It is almost the starting point! A qualitative leap is certainly needed in this sector, starting from public bodies. Rather than the existing European Directive on Open Data, we need a shift of mentality, or maybe a generational turnover. ACI is already active in this sector and we are committed to make this come true.